Abstracts: Marine Monument, How Lucy Died, and More

A roundup of science news from around the web — and around the world.

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• To end the week of celebrations for the National Parks Service’s 100th birthday, President Obama quadrupled the size of Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in Hawaii, making it larger than all existing national parks combined. (National Geographic)

According to new research, the ancient hominid Lucy may have died by falling out of a tree.

Visual: Travis/Flickr

• According to CT scans of the famous fossilized remains of the early human ancestor known as Lucy, the member of the species Australopithecus afarensis may have died from falling out of a tree. (BBC)

• Meteorologists came together to discuss the storm brewing in the Mid-Atlantic and what its future might be. (FiveThirtyEight)

• A physicist who was jailed in Iran for five years on suspicion of treason has been released on parole. (Nature)

• The pharmaceutical company Mylan has announced that it will create a cheaper generic version of it’s auto-injector, EpiPen. The announcement comes as the company faces increased criticism over raising the price of its product. (STAT)

• On Monday, the FAA announced new rules for flying commercial drones, which include requiring operators to keep the unmanned aerial vehicles in sight and only allowing them to be flown in daylight. (LA Times)

• California has long tried to be a leader in cutting carbon emissions, but its new goal will require some radical shifts to the state’s economy. (Vox)

• After an investigation prompted by reporting by the Oregonian/Oregon Live, an energy consultant on a $24 million solar project at two Oregon universities has been charged with forgery. (Oregonian)

• Monarch butterflies reached an extremely low number this year, the latest in the 20-year decline of the insect. (Chicago Tribune)

• And finally, after 100 years, a look at how science fits into today’s National Parks system. (New Yorker)

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